Magnetic particle imaging comes Down Under

AXT Pty Ltd

By LabOnline Staff
Thursday, 22 December, 2016


Magnetic particle

Scientific equipment supplier AXT has partnered with Magnetic Insight to make magnetic particle imaging (MPI) technology available to Australian researchers.

MPI is a molecular imaging modality that is said to provide researchers with unprecedented insight into the functioning of the target organs and tissue. The technology overcomes many of the shortcomings of existing medical imaging modalities — such as sensitivity, resolution and high contrast — offering the sensitivity of nuclear medicine, the resolution of MRI and the speed of CT.

Researchers can follow magnetic nanoparticles at nanomolar concentrations anywhere in the body regardless of tissue depth. These particles can be used to tag cells enabling detection down to 100 cells. MPI will directly benefit researchers working in fields such as oncology, vascular function, immunology, stem cell research, theranostic imaging and functional nanoparticle targeting, to name a few.

“AXT is committed to bringing new and exciting technologies to Australia and MPI is one that has enormous potential,” said AXT Managing Director Richard Trett. “The technology offers high-resolution, non-invasive functional imaging. It opens up long-term studies and other protocols impossible with PET and similar molecular imaging technologies. We look forward to meeting with potential adopters in the coming months to discuss how this technology can benefit their work.”

Magnetic Insight’s Momentum MPI imaging system is now available for preclinical imaging applications on small animals and utilises a workflow similar to (and as simple as) optical imaging. The system can generate quantitative images with the high contrast required to analyse functional responses to various treatments and drugs.

Pictured: Perfusion in a rat brain imaged using MPI technology.

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