Funding boost for two medical device companies


By LabOnline Staff
Monday, 10 April, 2017


Two Australian medical companies have received government funding to fast-track commercialisation.

Biomedical company Trimph Technology and medical device company NuCoria have received AU$691,114 and AU$300,000, respectively.

Trimph is an injectable medical device that accelerates the natural regeneration of cartilage, bone and numerous interface tissues. At room temperature, Trimph is liquid and able to be injected into desired locations. When the material heats to body temperature it forms an elastic gel that stays at the site without the need for physical containment. The liquid is gradually absorbed by the body, breaking down to non-toxic and biocompatible components. The unique regenerative capability of Trimph is based on its scaffolding properties and its selectable biological mediators. The biosafety and efficacy of the invention have been confirmed by a series of in vitro cell and in vivo animal studies.

Medical device company Nucoria is working towards commercialising its visual field analyser.

The diagnosis and management of retinal and neurological diseases requires functional assessment of the visual fields. Conventional visual field test devices (perimeters) use behavioural responses from patients and suffer from high rates of quality control failures and poor reproducibility. The NuCoria Visual Field Analyzer (nCFA), developed over several years by a team at the Australian National University, uses video recordings of tiny changes in pupil size in response to patented stimuli that are delivered to both eyes at 22 per second. The nCFA provides information on the both sensitivity (amplitude) and delay of responses.

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