Research & development > Life sciences

Species aren't adapting fast enough to climate change

13 August, 2019

Climate change is outpacing the ability of birds and other species to adapt to their changing environment, according to an international team of scientists.


Insects feel chronic pain too

23 July, 2019

Scientists have known insects experience something like pain since 2003, but new research has shown that insects also experience chronic pain that lasts long after an initial injury has healed.


Aphrodisiac pheromone found in fish semen

10 July, 2019

The semen of the male sea lamprey contains spermine, a highly specific and potent pheromone, which attracts ready-to-mate female sea lampreys.


Cranberries increase bacterial sensitivity to antibiotics

24 June, 2019

Cranberries are highly sought after for their tangy taste and the antioxidants they contain, but a new study provides evidence that they could also help in the fight against antibiotic resistance.


Breath test could replace pinprick testing in diabetics

14 June, 2019

Monitoring blood levels with the prick of a finger could be replaced with just a breath, thanks to a ketone-monitoring device developed at the University of Sydney.


Meet the tiny cousin of the Tyrannosaurus rex

10 May, 2019

A newly named tyrannosauroid dinosaur — Suskityrannus hazelae — stood less than a metre tall at the hip and was about 2.7 metres in length.


Twins study reveals how the human body changes in space

23 April, 2019

Results from NASA's landmark Twins Study, which studied one twin in spaceflight and one on the ground, have finally been published.


Metabolic reprogramming in cancer

20 February, 2019 by Mansi Gandhi

Metabolomics, a study of small molecules — or metabolites — within organisms, cells and tissues, is an important and rapidly growing branch of 'omics'.


'Cellular barcoding' pinpoints cells responsible for spread of cancer

18 February, 2019

Researchers have used a technique called cellular barcoding to tag, track and pinpoint cells responsible for the spread of breast cancer from the main tumour into the blood and other organs.


Research, industry collaborations increase by 64%

01 February, 2019

The relationship between researchers and industry has strengthened, according to the latest National Survey of Research Commercialisation.


Rare genetic brain disorder identified

25 January, 2019

An international team of researchers, led by MCRI, have identified a rare genetic brain disorder.


How hagfish choke their enemies with slime

23 January, 2019

The eel-like hagfish has survived on Earth for at least 300 million years, thanks to its ability to fend off predators by producing and choking them with slime.


Vampire bats could hold key to new treatments; criminal activity hampers research

21 January, 2019

Vampire bats could hold the key to new treatments for a range of serious medical problems, but researchers have hit a snag accessing the specimens needed to advance their work.


Aus–Norway partnership to create rapid-response vaccines

17 January, 2019

The University of Queensland and CEPI have signed a partnership to develop a technology that enables targeted and rapid vaccine production against multiple viral pathogens.


Eavesdropping viruses re-engineered to attack diseases

21 December, 2018 by Liz Fuller-Wright

Researchers have identified a virus — VP882 — that can listen in on bacterial conversations and can be re-engineered to attack diseases.


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